Beecology: Organic / Biodynamic Food Gardens for People and Pollinators

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 21 Jan 2016 until 21 Jan 2016
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Location
Okanagan Regional Library - Kelowna Branch

Category(ies)


The Public Art Pollinator Pasture Project and the Okanagan Regional Library is hosting the third talk of The Pollinizing Sessions: A Series of Talks and Workshops to Learn About Pollinators in Our Community. Gabe Cipes of Summerhill Winery will be giving his talk called, “Beecology: Organic / Biodynamic Food Gardens for People and Pollinators.”

Admission is free but people are encouraged to pre-register at http://pollinizingsessions-cipes.eventbrite.ca

Gabe Cipes is a Certified Permaculture designer, Beekeeper, Viticulturist and Biodynamicist at Summerhill Pyramid Winery. He works closely with the Traditional Ecological Knowledge Representatives (TEK) on the Syilx Ethical Agriculture project.  He is an International representative for Demeter Canada and sits on Boards of Directors for a number of organizations that include Summerhill Pyramid Winery, Certified Organic Associations of British Columbia (COABC), Biodynamic Agriculture Society of British Columbia (BDASBC), Demeter Canada, and the Food Policy Council.  Summerhill Vineyard is the largest Organic vineyard in Canada and has been certified for over 20 years.

The Pollinizing Sessions is a partnership with Okanagan Regional Library and UBC Okanagan’s research project, the Public Art Pollinator Pasture.   UBC Okanagan and Emily Carr University have teamed up for a three-year partnership project with the City of Kelowna and the City Richmond to create community and public art projects around bees.  The Pollinizing Sessions will host a series of eight talks and three workshops in 2016

For a complete list of these sessions see http://blogs.ubc.ca/theecoartincubator/the-pollinizing-sessions/ 

The series is sponsored by the Okanagan Regional Library, The Public Art Pollinator Pasture Project, and Border Free Bees.

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